8 Nudges to Write Fantasy With These Gorgeous Writing Prompts!

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I’m going to come straight out and just say it. I’m proud of these!

What’s not to love about beautiful images with a chunk of story to get your creative juices flowing?

It’s that time of year again.

When the faery folk come to dance upon the earth.

So light the way for them beneath the ancient tree.

If you remain still, you might get a glimpse of them.

Be careful though.

If they suspect a trap, they will grab you and imprison your soul in the tree for 1000 years.

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“Dance with the Devil, you handsome darling. If you please me, all your dreams will come true.”

“Are you saying you’re the Devil?”

The sensuous woman smiled and shrugged.

“I never thought of the Devil as a woman. So what dance?”

“Tango. Of course.”

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“You can’t be serious!”

“I am. Lie upon the yellow lines and the genie will come to grant you three wishes.”

“I thought genies lived in bottles and oil lamps.”

“Times have changed. Genies are now captive beneath the cement of roads and sidewalks.”

“What if a car runs over me?”

“That’s how the portal opens.”

“You must think I’m an idiot.”

“No. That’s the chance you gotta take. How badly do you want this?“

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Isabelle knew she was disappearing into the world of words, but she didn’t care.

Carlos begged her to stay, but she shook her head.

“I’d rather cease to exist physically if I get to enjoy all the pleasures of fantasy, of the erotic and romance.”

“What do you want, Isabelle, from the ethers of imagination? You will cease to be.”

”I know, darling Carlos. But ordinary life is mundane. I can’t bear the mundane.”

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Bernado’s heart pounded. This was the portal. it had to be.

But how could he get past that brick wall?

If he didn’t, Celeste was lost forever and their parents would perish from heartbreak.

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Fern yearned for the glory of humans. As psychic beings, plants healed, soothed, gave solace, and offered insight.

But there was no power. Plants were at the mercy of humans and animals.

Until the day a sad looking woman came into the forest undergrowth and lay down on top of Fern.

Fern felt her sorrow, and knew its time had come. This woman no longer wanted to be human.

“How about if we trade places?” Fern whispered. “You become me and I become you.”

The woman looked right at Fern.

“Is that possible?”

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She was emerging. She could feel herself coming back to flesh, blood, and bone.

After so many centuries held captive in the trees, she would be free at last.

“Why now?” she asked. “Why let me go now when the world is so changed?”

“Because we need you to convince humanity to protect us.”

“Why would I do that?”

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Ophelia threw herself into the water, but instead of the death she sought in her despair, she found conviction.

She deserved life. Only revenge would do for her father’s death.

Hamlet would suffer.

SO HERE THEY ARE! THE FANTASY WRITING PROMPTS FOR JULY. HOPE YOU LOVE THE IMAGES AS MUCH AS I LOVED PUTTING THEM TOGETHER, AND I HOPE THEY GET THE STORIES SPINNING!

PEACE,

MONTGOMERY



Your Girls Are Good - Novel Excerpt "The Shepherd and the Courtesan"

By Émile Bernard - Christie's, LotFinder: entry 5493043, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17885614

Novel Excerpt out of my work-in-progress, “The Shepherd and the Courtesan.” For a previous excerpt, go here.

“You must have done something supernatural to be here, Wanderer. None of Ella Bandita’s conquests have ever been redeemed.”

Adrianna moved fast, reaching down to take the Wanderer’s hand in hers before he could react.

“Did you get your heart back as well?”

Adrianna paused as she pressed her fingers into the side of his wrist.

“Well, well. I feel a pulse.”

“As I said,” the Wanderer murmured. “I was lucky.”

“That was more than luck,” she retorted. “She must be dead for you to get that crystal stargaze, and get your heart back. How did you kill her?”

“You can hardly expect a confession,” I interrupted. “We would hang.”

“For destroying a monster? I don’t think so, Shepherd. You and the Wanderer are our most cherished heroes. Legends will be told about you long after you are gone.”

Adrianna glanced to Celia who stood two paces behind the Wanderer, and then to Astrid who must have stood about the same distance from me. She nodded appreciatively to both of them.

“Well done tonight, girls. You may go and finish supper in the Joy Parlor.”

Astrid touched my shoulder with a soft hand.

“It really was an honor to meet you, Shepherd. I enjoyed our talk.”

I nodded, surprised that my feeling towards Astrid was one of neutral benevolence.

Celia threw her arms around the Wanderer’s neck and kissed his cheek.

“Thank you for leaving your fortune to the orphans,” she said. “It means more to me than I can ever tell you.”

“Okay,” the Wanderer said. “But it was nothing, really.”

He was obviously confused, not having heard that the woman he had made love to twice had grown up in the orphanage. Once the young courtesans followed a steward and maid back into the Casa, the Wanderer focused on Adrianna and whistled appreciatively.

“Your girls are good,” he said.

“Of course, they are. I trained them. So tell me how you got your heart back, Wanderer.”

“Let’s just say I had exquisite timing.”

“I’m sure it’s quite a story.”

“I suppose.”

“I would love to hear it.”

The Wanderer smiled at Adrianna and shook his head. Reaching for the leftover wild duck croquettes, he ate what was left, his deep black eyes peering steadily at his wily hostess.

Adrianna smiled and backed off. She took her seat in the chair Astrid had left vacant. Nodding to her servants, the stewards brought us each the fourth course, steaming bowls of pureed chestnut soup, while the maids poured red wine in ample goblets, and handed them to all three of us. Adrianna leaned back and took a sip.

“I must say, Wanderer, the years you lived as a Wolf have served you beautifully. I’ve always found rugged men most attractive. We don’t get much chance of meeting those in our civilized Capital City.”

“You flatter me, Madame.”

Adrianna smiled graciously.

“I told the Shepherd, and now I’ll tell you to call me Adrianna.”

“Your praise is generous, Adrianna. But I’ve never been one to be swayed by compliments.”

They smiled at each other in understanding. But Adrianna was far from done. She turned back to me and peered at me intently, her lovely golden eyes sparkling in the light.

“One thing I’ll say for my nemesis, Shepherd, she certainly had exquisite taste.”

“What are you talking about?”

“You are the man who loved Ella Bandita. The only man whose heart she didn’t steal.”

“No. She broke it instead.”

Writing Tips! Character, Plotting, Novel Structure, Oh My!

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Plot first, character second, or character first, plot second?

That is the question many of us struggle with.

General rule of thumb: Characters who drive the plot make up literary fiction; a fully developed plot where the characters come across as ‘flat’ or ‘1-dimensional,’ kind of like actors in a play, make up commercial fiction.

Perhaps that is an oversimplification. But generally speaking, it’s pretty easy to discern when a novel has its foundation in ‘character’ or ‘plot.’

To refer again the marvelous Margaret Grossman, one is either a plot writer or a character writer, and each envies the other their talent.

As a plot writer, I’ve had to research and devise tools to give birth to more intriguing characters – or at least, I think they’re intriguing. But I haven’t a clue how to show those writers who struggle with plot how to develop one.

Remember the post, Engaging Characters or Juicy Plot?

In it, I gave a character checklist for those who write plots but don’t write characters naturally. If you’ve never seen that post, here’s the link.

This is a similar tool I use when I’m struggling with fleshing out characters and why they do the things they do. Since I write plot naturally, I have to work on developing characters. Yet it’s very difficult to give pointers on something that comes naturally, at least it is for me.

Anyhow, on Pinterest, I came across a writer, Penelope Redmont, who offered a very simple and elegant method for developing plot, clearly for those who naturally write character. Here’s that wonderful blog here.

Also, while I’m at it, here is my Cage-Escape-Quest-Dragons-Home, the basic structure for forming chapters and the arc of the novel as a whole. This may help with the character arcs Penelope Redmont refers to in her blog, Plotting Fiction: 3 Plotting Tips to Make Fiction Easy.

And guess what else? Penelope Redmont writes Romance! Regency romance and romantic suspense – ha! Oh, what an odd coincidence that is! For anybody who doesn’t understand why that’s strange and would like to know, check it out here.